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More cabinet painting

Posted on 13 April, 2018 at 14:45 Comments comments (50)
Cabinet painting can be very time consuming and tedious but if you are up for the challenge and want to save the money by doing it yourself. these are my recommendations. First off you are going to have to decide if you are going to brush or spray. I will walk you through how we sprayed these cabinets. First you should  find a  well ventilated area your home that has no lit pilot lights if you want to use the primer that I did this time. Plan on eating out for a week or two.


On this project we removed all the furniture from the room and masked the ceilings and walls to protect them from over spray. If you have a large empty room near your  kitchen, you can utilize it to spay and or let your draws and doors dry painted side up to reduce the risk of runs.

The first step was to wash all the cabinets with a strong solution of T.S.P. (non rinse substitute) to make sure to remove any grease, grime and mildew. A little  bleach helps with the mildew. T.S.P. use to say that it de-glossed shinny surfaces but it doesn't claim that so much anymore on most brands. Jasco does.

Then you are going to want to sand all surfaces that are going to be painted. On this job it was the cabinet faces, drawer faces, and the inside and outside of all the doors. I find that the 4 sided (220 fine ) sanding sponges work very well. You just want to scuff the surface to give it some tooth. Sanding is also helpful in removing or minimizing dings and scratches. large ones should be filled with Bondo and smaller ones with painters putty.

The next step is to remove all the doors and hardware, number all your doors so you know where they go after all coats have dried. I like spraying my doors on a table, letting them dry for a little bit and the leaning them up against a wall to cure. I  mark the doors inside of where the hinge was removed and then cover it with tape

The product I used on this job was Zinsser B.I..N Shellac primer. I dries hard and fast and is pretty easy to sand but is very strong odored alcohol base product and need to where a good respirator. I was fortunate to be able to use this product during the cold weather because the homeowners left town for a week and by the time they got home all the plastic was removed from all the walls and doorways. The work area was aired out and the odor had dissipated.

For the two finished coats I used Benjamin Moore ADVANCED Waterborne Interior which seemed to work very well.

The home owners got home from their vacation and their home was back to normal only all the cabinets where painted. They were very happy.

Painting over stained doors and cabinets.

Posted on 17 November, 2015 at 16:33 Comments comments (71)
An affordable and effective way to update and improve the appearance of the interior of your home is to paint over your previously stained doors and cabinets. California has made it hard for residential painting contractors to do a good job while applying fine finishes to doors and cabinets  on account of all the restrictions and conversion to environmentally safe products. For a couple years I could not find a good primer that would adhere good to oil base finishes, that was sand able, and would block stains and yellowing.  Applying latex paint over an oil-based stain was once impossible. However, modern technology has allowed paint manufacturers to develop acrylic latex that adheres to virtually any surface, including plastic and oil-based finishes.
 On these doors and cabinets I used 2 different primers. The 1st one being Zinsser Cover stain classic oil base which preformed well when completely dry. It is now formulated to be  compliant with California restrictions I guess. I could go over all the surfaces with 220 sandpaper , no problem. it says it is low VOC content  but I still definitely had to where a respirator blow out the pilot light to the heater and keep the room well ventilated. I did have to strain it with a pair of my  girlfriends panty hose because they don't sale fine strainers at paint or hardware stores here any more, since everything went latex.

The second coat I used Dunne Edwards ULTRA-GRIP Premium 

These where the selling points.
  • Excellent adhesion to properly prepared drywall, wood, and masonry, as well as hard-to-stick surfaces, such as aged alkyd, aluminum, galvanized metal, vinyl, fiberglass, and select plastics
  • Outstanding stain-blocking
  • Strong tannin resistance
  • Great hide and excellent enamel holdout
  • Ultra-low VOC content
  • The finish was 2 coats of Kelly Moore's Dura Poxy. which dries very hard and is very durable.

    In trying to find the right combination of products  I think we did pretty well, and the customers where very pleased